Wednesday, 14 March 2012

Too Beautiful To Chop

Photo Copyright: Maggie May

There is nothing more Spring like than a tree in full blossom and it lifted my heart to see this tree on the edge of one of Bristol's fine parks while out walking the other day.
I stopped to take a photo.
When I actually entered the park and saw the tree from the other side, I spied a notice that had been stuck on the tree trunk and on reading it, my heart sank because it is due to be chopped down. There had been some fungus found at the base of the tree trunk. The tree was not going to be replaced because it didn't fit in with the park planning, whatever that meant.

Later in the week on Radio Bristol, I heard that the Council were suggesting that some of the city's parks could be sold and the money used for the local communities. As this park was mentioned by name as one of the parks that could be sold, I was appalled by this. No matter how much money the local community had to spend, once the park is sold, then it can never again be purchased. How short sighted and with no thought for the future generations of children and adults who would not be able to enjoy the beauty, space and childrens' play area as we have all done. To say nothing of the cafe and paddling pool and the chance to have picnics in a lovely setting without leaving the city.
Has this generation lost sight of the benefit of walking in beautiful places? Is it really all about money? Can giving up a green space be justified for cramming tiny houses and flats in a small space, at prices that nobody can afford anyway?
Is a bit of fungus so dangerous that a beautiful tree has to be cut down? Can't it be treated before such drastic action is taken?
What is wrong with the Council who isn't thinking beyond the end of their nose?
What gets up your nose because this has certainly got up mine?



21 comments:

Akelamalu said...

Closing parks????? That's downright criminal!!!

Formerly known as Frau said...

It's all about making money and balancing budgets! Sad open spaces are so far and few to be found! Enjoy that lovely tree while you can!

rosaria said...

Ah, time to gather friends and do some OCCUPYING!

FeltByRae said...

That makes me so angry, while it may be possible the tree has to go, who is to say replacing it won't 'fit in' - what tosh... parks aren't supposed to be all matching and 'proper'

And as for selling off parks, that is appalling

SueAnn said...

It isn't in my neighborhood but I am appalled as well. How dare they be thinking of money when a park is so needful. I hope the public rises up and protests this.
How sad.
Hugs
SueAnn

Jinksy said...

I suppose it depends whether the fungus is of a type that would spread to ALL the trees, and whether there's a know cure for it...

Shammickite said...

Time to write a letter to the newspaper. And another one to your Member of Parliament. The local radio station. Circulate a petition. Write to the Mayor. Go to the next town council meeting. If all else fails, gather some likewise concerned citizens and chain yourselves to the tree. I'm not kidding! If the fungus isn't curable, then I would understand that the tree has to go, to save the other trees in the vicinity, but keep the park at least! People need parks.

Mary G said...

I've got one in my yard. Hanging on by bits of bark. But it blooms every year and the birds love it, so there it stays.
We also have a big (big!) pine near the house that is not in good shape. If it breaks off, it will rip out our electricity lines. But the girls climbed it as children, built a house there, loved it.
These things are always hard decisions.
But to sell parks. STUPID!

Suburbia said...

Really bad news Maggie, such precious places and as you say once gone that's it. I am cross too and I really hope they don't sell off our lovely parks which we are so well blessed with here.

I wonder if there is a petition somewhere on line to save the parks? I can't imagine the council will get away with it without some fuss.

I feel really cross now too! And sad in a way that these things are even considered.

St Jude said...

It may sound strange, but I have a park. I said it sounded strange, my great, great grandfather gifted a large amount of land to be used in the village that I was born, to be used as a recreational park. To ensure that nobody could take it in the future or build on it, there is a clause in my families wills that insists that it is inherited by another family member and they are not allowed to sell it. In the century or so since then a city has grown around it and it is the only park in the area. My mother passed on this inheritance to me.

Irene said...

Parks shouldn't be allowed to be sold. It's a ridiculous idea. I've never heard of such silliness. Do protest it loudly. If need be, get the city council fired for incompetence.

CiCi said...

As the population climbs there is less space for all the people. I know that parks have less priority here as well. The future generations will not know how beautiful some places were.

cheshire wife said...

The fungus does not seem to be affecting the tree at the moment but spores from the fungus can be blown around by wind and other trees will become infected.

Bernie said...

If enough people spoke out to the council against selling the park I am sure some of them would change their minds. I think it is disgusting how green spaces are being bought up for others to make a profit. Hope you both are doing well Maggie, I think of you every day.....prayers and hugs, xo

Leilani Lee said...

Not too many years ago the sages on our town council almost killed the public library because "it wasn't generating any revenue." Public outcry saved the library, but barely (no money for new books, etc). They dismantled the hard-won recycling center for the same reason. One wonders how short these peoples' noses are. Sometimes those "fungus" cannot be fixed -- thinking about all of the elm trees in the U.S., that were decimated because of a disease.

Retired English Teacher said...

I agree with you! I wonder if these councils have lost their souls. We have the same situation in my former hometown. The parks were not watered, the lights were turned of, and the garbage cans were removed. Now, they say they have a little money, so they will turn the water back on.

Our forefathers sacrificed to set aside this land for parks. We must fight to keep them.

Pearl said...

I live in Minneapolis, Minnesota, a largish city well known for its park systems, and this would certainly "get up my nose" as well.

:-)

Green space, as they call it, is so important for a city, a spot for a deep breath and scenery that is not man-made.

Pearl

RNSANE said...

Goodness, what a beautiful tree and, the thought that it will meet its demise, is deplorable. Even worse is the thought that the whole park might cease to exist, with a lake and picnic areas for all to enjoy, etc. Has there yet been a public outcry about the loss of this wonderful wide open space. San Francisco, my home - though I have been happily away in India for almost four months now, has a few very special parks and open spaces. Thank God, or our citizens would be psychotic!

Rose said...

How sad...no, this is downright infuriating! Someone needs to speak up at a council meeting or organize a protest. Research has shown the benefits of open spaces like this, including all kinds of positive effects on children. Not every benefit can be counted in terms of money, but that seems to be what is ruling the world these days.

I can't tell just what kind of tree this is, but a fungus should be treatable. And to cut it down because it doesn't "fit in with the park planning" sounds ridiculous!

By the way, just took 2 of the grandkids to see "The Lorax" yesterday, so I'm on more of a crusade than usual:) Maybe these councilmen/women should see that movie!

Wendy said...

I will chime in with everybody else. Save the tree. Perhaps a fungicide would help.
Closing parks? Are they nuts???

Hilary said...

I had to remove my own plum tree a couple of years back because of fungus. My tree did not look at all healthy by the time it was taken down. Reading up on it, there was nothing that could be done for this particular problem and the spores would spread to other neighbourhood fruit trees if I didn't take it down. I'd want to know more about that particular condition and if it could be saved, I'd hope they would try.

As for giving up your parks? That's ludicrous. People are already far too distanced from nature. Parks give us that little bit of wild life in the city. They necessary for our mental well-being.