Saturday, 30 April 2016

Living The Impossible Dream?


I've just been to see a collection of pictures drawn and coloured by Syrian refugee children who're still in camps, many after being there for several years.
The collection is at present being held in John Wesley's Chapel in the heart of Bristol.
There are photos of each child standing in front of their tent with their age and how long they've been there and their dreams printed below.

Some of the children just want an education and are hoping to be lawyers, teachers, artists and other things that are really possible for children who are in countries that are at peace, but will be difficult for them in their present situation.
Some just want a bike like any other child of their age.
Quite a few just wanted to be able to go home and get on with their lives. 
The picture I've chosen was drawn by a child who had dreams and hopes of peace.

I was moved by this visit and was very close to tears by the time I left.
They're just young children who want to live in a fair world and get on with things. It's so easy when most of our children have so much, not to take things for granted.

16 comments:

Marie Smith said...

I would feel sad too, seeing the display. Canada has taken in Syrian refugees and I have donated to local efforts to support them. It all seems so inadequate though.

Celia said...

I look a photos of those refugee children and wonder how will will survive cast to winds as they are. I can't help but see my own grandkids in them and what each of us can do seems so insignificant but we try. I saw an article asking people to stop sending toys and teddy bears and contribute instead to funds for food and medicine and I agree. Can't eat a darned teddy bear or shelter from the rain with it.

Celia said...

Sorry for the typos, seems to be my morning for it.

Mary Gilmour said...

I belong to a committee from our local town that has sponsored a refugee family and hopes to host two more. The Canadian government red tape to do this would choke a cow. Meanwhile, these little artists are the lucky children. They are alive.

ADDY said...

That is so sad. Children get caught up in the sins of their grown-ups. It never fails to amaze me why we can't have universal world peace. There's always someone somewhere wanting to fight either out of greed or on the pretext of religion.

Sally Wessely said...

What a beautiful commentary on such a heartbreaking situation. I am so moved when I see the photos of these poor refugees. Truly this entire mess is just terrible. Truly, the children are the victims of grown-up problems. The artist captured his or her resilient spirt in the piece of art you shared with us. Thank you for sharing.

rosaria williams said...

Very touching, indeed.

dianefaith said...

I get mad about the way so many in the US respond to the refugee situation, and then I'm mad at myself because I know I'm not doing enough to help, either. It's an overwhelming, complicated issue, and innocent kids are caught in it.

Jinksy said...

Thank goodness dreams don't depend on anything but imagination! :-)

Jackie said...

You have a tender heart, and I'm thankful that the world is still filled with kind and loving people such as you, Maggie.
My prayer is that the dream of each child becomes a reality.
Sending you love,
Jackie

Suburbia said...

I think I would be moved to tears too Maggie. I still can't believe the government are arguing about taking in refugee children - I'm disgusted with them.

Expat mum said...

Poor kids. What did they ever do?

Wisewebwoman said...

Beautiful and inspiring and so very sad. Sweden set an example, the rest of us are very slow to embrace these innocents.

XO
WWW

Rose said...

I'm not surprised you were in tears when you left; I would be, too. The whole situation is so sad, but even more so when you think of the innocent children. I hope our US leaders come to their senses and stop being so paranoid and accept more of these refugees.

Shammickite said...

A Syrian family with 4 children has cone to live in my Canadian town, sponsored by the townspeople. They are the lucky ones.... a house provided for a year, a job, and school for the children. Money is being raised to sponsor a second family. I wish we could help them all.

cheshire wife said...

It is very sad, but good to see that the children have not lost their imagination.