Thursday, 25 June 2009

Pero's Bridge

PhotoStory Friday
Hosted by Cecily and MamaGeek




Like Liverpool, Bristol was very much a part of the Slave Trade, (was it 400 years ago?) The city prospered because of the buying and selling of slaves and many of the beautiful buildings that are standing now were built with *blood money* from the profit of it. I don't know all the ins and outs of what went on, but can well imagine the horrors of it and most people are repulsed by that era, so Bristol decided to *apologize* for it's part in the evil practice by naming this new bridge after a slave who was documented as being sent here. His name was Pero and this is now called Pero's Bridge.
It certainly can't make up for the horrors that went on, but maybe the bridge can be a reminder of the past and what happens when one race feels superior to another.
The two great, heavy horns on the bridge are used to balance it when the bridge goes up to let a tall ship go through!


Thumbelina, from Secret Worlds chose me and five others to take part in a photographic meme.
The rules were, that you had to go to your photo files and open the sixth one and choose the sixth photo in it and publish it. Then choose six more people to do the challenge.

I looked in my sixth folder at my sixth photo and found personal photos that I didn't want published, so I altered things a bit and reversed the challenge.
I went to the last photo folder and opened the sixth folder from the end of that and counted six photos from the end of the sixth and came up with Pero's Bridge and I am quite pleased with it.

Over to you now. I am not very good at choosing people, so are there six of you out there who want to do this meme?

Photostory Friday is hosted by Cecily and MamaGeek. For more lovely photos please look them up.

26 comments:

Ryanne said...

It is a beautiful bridge and so nice that it represents the current mind set and shows abhorrence for the past mistakes of people It is well stated that one group of people should not think themselves higher than another! Great post. Thank you!

Nessa said...

A very fascinating picture and so interesting. For some reason, I thought slave trading in Britain was outlawed longer ago. I know they permitted it in their territories but not on the Motherland.

Lauren said...

It is a beautiful bridge and a poignant reminder of past mistakes!

lakeviewer said...

Very unusual horns at the entrance/exit of the bridge. What a wonderful reminder.

Thumbelina said...

Well done Maggie - I knew you could do it! And I am glad you did - we learned a little more history and I got to see a bridge I might not otherwise have seen. Thanks for posting it.

Carrie and Troy Keiser said...

I'd have to second Ryanne's comment.
Sometimes the human race is slow to learn. Thank you for this reminder that we are all human and that we make mistakes sometime very grievous ones.

Chris said...

What a fascinating history.

A bridge is a power symbol of healing, isn't it?

SandyCarlson said...

I didn't realize that about Bristol. Thanks for this informative post. That's quite an interesting bridge.

Alex the Girl said...

Very interesting photo. I like the lines you have leading into the horns of the bridge. I thought the slave trade was outlawed longer than that, as well. I guess it goes to show that our histories aren't as old and dusty as we wish they would be.

Leah said...

Great little lesson.

Sharon said...

That is a great story for photo Friday! That is a neat bridge!

bindhiya said...

Dear Maggie may,
A great picture!
hope you having a great day.
♥ & ((hugs))
bindi

The Green Stone Woman said...

My own country made a lot of money in the slave trade. It was just a commercial enterprise to them. A way to make cheap money. It is a shameful chapter in our history, which should not be dismissed. We all need a Pero brdige.

Suburbia said...

I wondered what the horns were for, I thought they were decorative only!

Casdok said...

I always thoughts the horns were Shrek ears so interesting to hear a bit of the history.

Working Mum said...

What a heart warming story. And an interesting bridge!

Moannie said...

An interesting meme and a fascinating story to go with it.

A story to still shame us all.

Rose said...

I'm glad this is the picture you found--very interesting. The US certainly has its shameful memories as well; bridges like this or museums that commemorate such terrible times in our history help to remind us of the past so that we never make similar mistakes again.

kaye said...

An interesting picture, and an interesting history behind it. Also interesting is the way you came to post it :) Here’s my photo story. happy Friday!

Jeni said...

A very good theme for a bridge that serves the purpose bridges should serve and also, tries to bridge from the bad of the past into some good for the future. Great post, Maggie.

Elaine A. said...

Interesting story. That's a pretty neat looking bridge. For some reason this photo makes me want to travel... : )

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menopausaloldbag (MOB) said...

I think the photo was just perfect and a fitting thing to remind us of our dubious history. Terrific.

lisaschaos said...

Somehow I don't imagine that naming the bridge really washes away the the guilt but it's a good start. :) Pretty bridge too!

Indrani said...

Great capture of the bridge.

Bina said...

What a sad, but wonderful story. I just can't believe how much history you have around you!